Tech: Digital Panoramas

60 foot Tripod at the National Academy of Sciences

May 25, 2012.      The Imaging Research Center (IRC) at UMBC is creating an iPad app for visitors to explore and understand the gold-leaf painted dome of the Great Hall at the National Academy of Sciences.  The building, which was built in the 1920s and sits on the National Mall, was recently refurbished.

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Great Hall Dome, National Academy of Sciences 60 foot Tripod at National Academy of Sciences Raising Tripod at National Academy of Sciences
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Missing Mercator: Alternative Projections

  Flattening a full 360° spherical image onto a 2D surface involves different projection methods.  The most familiar to us is the “Mercator” projection, developed by Gerardus Mercator in 1569 that has been used for centuries to display the globe on a 2D map.  This image of Earth is typical of this method and is comfortable to us, but it is actually very distorted.  We all know that Antarctica is not 5 times the size of South America.   For various reasons we disregard these particular distortions. Mercator’s projection method makes immediate sense because moving up from any point on the […]

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Earth, Hyperbolic Projection Spruce Tree Example Crab Tree Falls Example Earth’s Surface Example of Planet
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Quick Overview: Part Two, Stitching a Panorama

Many people ask me how a full 360/180 degree digital panorama is made.  Here is Part Two from my Oak Branch Demo Series that gives a very simple overview of stitching a digital panorama. This demo also quickly covers how the camera and tripod are removed from a final panorama.  Part One is a demo of using a camera and panorama head to shoot this particular panorama.

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Quick Overview: Part One, Shooting a Panorama

Many people ask me how a full 360/180 degree digital panorama is made.  Here is a 3 minute video from my Oak Branch Demo Series that gives a very simple overview of digital panoramas. You can see the process of taking a full 360/180 degree panorama and how the camera and tripod are removed in the final panorama.  Part Two is a quick overview of how this panorama was stitched together.

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